Tomato Soup

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You know those weekends when you overdo it?  It starts on Friday when you have a wine after work to wind down, and next thing you know there is a pile of wine bottles empty on the table.  Saturday morning comes.  You get up at the crack of dawn to take those beloved offspring to whatever sport starts 3 hours earlier than you need to be awake, your head is pounding and your belly rumbles ominously.  You swear you will never drink again. But then at about 3 o’clock you start thinking hair of the dog is what you need to feel better, and then a couple of buddies pop over, and next thing you know you have another bigger pile of wine bottles empty on the table. Sunday morning is even scarier than Saturday, but thankfully the little sprogs have no sport on Sundays.  After a few hours of agony you start thinking about hair of the dog again.  What you really need is a serious health hit.  Something to expunge all those toxins and reinstate some lost vitamins and minerals.  This is when I make this tomato soup.

Recipes abound for tomato soup, and I have tried lots of them, but this one is so fresh and light I can’t go past it.  Wal calls it his liquid energy pellet.

Recipe

  • 3 T olive oil
  • 2 onion, finely chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, (crushed or grated)
  • 3 stalks celery
  • 1 carrot
  • 2 t yellow mustard seeds
  • 1/2 t tumeric
  • 1 t sweet paprika (can also use hot)
  • 2 T plain flour
  • 1 T honey
  • 3 c chicken stock (homemade is best, but any stock works)
  • 400 g can tomatoes
  • 1 kg fresh tomatoes. chopped
  • 4 T dried red lentils
  • sour cream and parsley to serve

Saute onions, garlic and celery in oil, when onions start to become translucent, add spices and flour. Mix well and add 1 cup of water as bottom of pan starts to become sticky.  Add remaining ingredients, and cook on low for at least an hour. The s0up cooks quickly but needs time for the flavours to infuse.  The lentils are important because they break down and help to provide body to the soup, but if you don’t have any you can add a chopped potato.  Blenderizing the soup is optional, I do it sometimes, but if you chop the ingredients finely it has a good texture as is.  Serve with sour cream (or cottage cheese) and a generous topping of parsley and warm bread or toast.  Don’t have a wine with dinner.

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About baking bohemian

My name is Jen and I am the baking bohemian. My blog identity comes from the cultural background of my mother’s family, (Bohemian), and my mother’s more left wing lifestyle (bohemian). The big ‘B’ Bohemian refers to the rich cultural heritage of our family that emigrated from Bohemia when it was still its own country (it now comprises two thirds of the Czech Republic). Food featured prominently in the family and broader social life of that part of my family. No social interaction was without sustenance, and any celebration, large or small, was an invitation to cook up a storm. My own family emigrated from the United States to Australia when I was a child. For the most part we lived with our mother, and my dad eventually moved back to the US. The little ‘b’ bohemian relates to the semi-alternative lifestyle we led with our mother. I hesitate to refer to her as a hippy, for that conjures up so many misconceptions, but certainly she was on that side of the fence. She was probably more eccentric than radical at the end of the day, but she could really cook. We always set extra plates at the dinner table because inevitably people would visit at dinner time. I started cooking when I was about eight. Cookies. Obviously I was motivated by desire! I loved cooking, I loved that the kitchen was always, in every way, the heart of the house, so I was always part of anything else that was happening while I was cooking. I loved people loving my food. With all the different things that I have done in my life and am interested in, food has remained my most consistent and enduring passion.

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