Mint Pea Dip

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I am always amazed at the volume of food that is consumed when I have people over. Especially when there are kids involved.  It’s not a bad thing – I would feel inadequate if the entire mountain of food I presented wasn’t enthusiastically devoured, but … it does pay to have some fillers in there to start things off.

Dips are a great option. They go in and out of fashion, but the reality is, people love them, and the flavour and ingredient combinations are endless.  This is one of those recipes that is more successful with kids if you don’t tell them what’s in it. I’m not sure why, but the poor old pea maintains its dreary reputation although I am sure none of the kids I know have been subjected to the over-boiled mushy nightmares of generations gone by.

This dip is lovely and fresh and is good with vegetables or crackers. I have served this one with crackers made from lavash and lebanese flat bread.

Recipe

  • 2 1/2 c frozen (or fresh) peas, cooked
  • 2 T finely chopped fresh basil
  • 1 t finely chopped fresh mint
  • 1 T fresh lemon juice
  • 1 T fresh lime juice
  • 2 T macadamia oil
  • 2/3 c sour cream
  • 2/3 c Greek style yoghurt

Blend all ingredients in a food processor until smooth.

Crackers

  • 6 sheets of lavash bread or lebanese flat bread
  • 2 T macadamia oil
  • 1/2 t cumin
  • 1/2 t paprika
  • 1-2 t sea salt flakes
  • 2 T sesame seeds

Preheat oven to 200C.

Mix oil with cumin and paprika. Brush over the bread. Cut bread into cracker sized pieces. Sprinkle with salt and sesame seeds.

Place on tray in oven and cook until crisp (approx 5 minutes).  Be careful not to overlap the crackers on the tray, and keep an eye on them because they burn fast!

Cracker recipe courtesy of my friend Antoinette!

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About baking bohemian

My name is Jen and I am the baking bohemian. My blog identity comes from the cultural background of my mother’s family, (Bohemian), and my mother’s more left wing lifestyle (bohemian). The big ‘B’ Bohemian refers to the rich cultural heritage of our family that emigrated from Bohemia when it was still its own country (it now comprises two thirds of the Czech Republic). Food featured prominently in the family and broader social life of that part of my family. No social interaction was without sustenance, and any celebration, large or small, was an invitation to cook up a storm. My own family emigrated from the United States to Australia when I was a child. For the most part we lived with our mother, and my dad eventually moved back to the US. The little ‘b’ bohemian relates to the semi-alternative lifestyle we led with our mother. I hesitate to refer to her as a hippy, for that conjures up so many misconceptions, but certainly she was on that side of the fence. She was probably more eccentric than radical at the end of the day, but she could really cook. We always set extra plates at the dinner table because inevitably people would visit at dinner time. I started cooking when I was about eight. Cookies. Obviously I was motivated by desire! I loved cooking, I loved that the kitchen was always, in every way, the heart of the house, so I was always part of anything else that was happening while I was cooking. I loved people loving my food. With all the different things that I have done in my life and am interested in, food has remained my most consistent and enduring passion.

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