Pumpkin Feta Pastries

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I rarely have people over for dinner mid-week.  It is just so hard to get a meal going, and then get the kids into bed in anything resembling a decent hour, that it’s all too hard. However, when I do go for the mid-week option, I look for impressive + easy. This is where options like store-bought puff pastry come in very handy.

These pastries make a wonderful crunchy, sweet/savoury appetiser.

Recipe

  • 5 sheets puff pastry
  • 1/2 small blue pumpkin (or butternut squash)
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • olive oil
  • 20 cherry tomatoes
  • 200g marinated feta
  • 200g ricotta
  • handful continental parsley
  • 1 egg, lightly whisked

Preheat oven to 180C.  Line baking trays. Oil additional baking tray. Grate or crush garlic and spread over the oiled tray. Chop pumpkin into large even chunks (you can leave the skin on at this point), and lay on baking tray in a single layer. Bake until just getting soft – flipping over periodically to coat in the garlic and oil. Once cool enough ot handle, cut skin off the pumpkin and chop into smaller pieces.

While pumpkin is cooking, separate the pastry sheets to defrost.  Chop tomatoes into quarters, chop feta into small pieces, and finely chop the parsley.

Cut each piece of pastry into 4 squares. Prick the pastry with a fork.  Place a teaspoon of ricotta in the middle of each pastry piece. Create small mounds over the ricotta with the pumpkin, feta, tomatoes and parsley, leaving a border around the mound.  Brush the borders of each pastry with the egg and place on baking trays.

Bake for about 12 minutes or until pastry is golden.  Serve immediately.

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About baking bohemian

My name is Jen and I am the baking bohemian. My blog identity comes from the cultural background of my mother’s family, (Bohemian), and my mother’s more left wing lifestyle (bohemian). The big ‘B’ Bohemian refers to the rich cultural heritage of our family that emigrated from Bohemia when it was still its own country (it now comprises two thirds of the Czech Republic). Food featured prominently in the family and broader social life of that part of my family. No social interaction was without sustenance, and any celebration, large or small, was an invitation to cook up a storm. My own family emigrated from the United States to Australia when I was a child. For the most part we lived with our mother, and my dad eventually moved back to the US. The little ‘b’ bohemian relates to the semi-alternative lifestyle we led with our mother. I hesitate to refer to her as a hippy, for that conjures up so many misconceptions, but certainly she was on that side of the fence. She was probably more eccentric than radical at the end of the day, but she could really cook. We always set extra plates at the dinner table because inevitably people would visit at dinner time. I started cooking when I was about eight. Cookies. Obviously I was motivated by desire! I loved cooking, I loved that the kitchen was always, in every way, the heart of the house, so I was always part of anything else that was happening while I was cooking. I loved people loving my food. With all the different things that I have done in my life and am interested in, food has remained my most consistent and enduring passion.

8 responses »

  1. Shouldn’t have read that just before lunch. Sounds so good. I’m going to try it for a playgroup mums’ dinner I’m hosting in a couple of weeks. I’m going to make mini ones for finger food. Thanks Jen.

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