Milk Bread

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Milk Bread

I bake a fair bit of bread.  Homemade bread is just so much nicer than store bought.  Lately I have been baking a lot more of it than usual.  I am going to credit this current bread baking fad to my Thermomix (my new and most beloved toy) for making the whole process so much quicker and easier – it makes it so easy to whip up a loaf.

However, even without the Wonder Machine this is an easy yeast bread to make. This is a Swiss sweet bread. It is delicious plain, but also works well with dried fruit added.

Recipe

  • 300 g milk
  • 50 g butter
  • 20 g fresh yeast
  • 60 g sugar
  • 550 g bakers flour
  • ¼ t salt
  • 1 egg, beaten in a bowl
By hand

  1. Place   milk, butter and sugar in medium saucepan and gently heat until sugar has   dissolved and integrated into milk and butter. Set aside to cool to lukewarm.
  2. Add   yeast to milk mixture and mix. Leave allow yeast to react and become foamy –   about 7 minutes.
  3. Place   flour and salt into a large bowl and mix.    Add milk mixture and mix until a dough forms and starts to pull away   from the sides of the bowl.
  4. Turn   dough onto a floured surface and knead until it becomes smooth and   elastic.  This is a soft dough so it   will only take a few minutes of fairly gentle kneading. Place dough in a   large floured bowl, cover and leave in a warm place to rise until doubled in   size (~ 1 hour).
  5. Turn   dough out onto floured surface again and divide into 3 equal portions.  Roll the portions into 30cm lengths to be   braided.  Leave to rest for 5 minutes,   then join the lengths at one end and braid them together. Join at the other   end.
  6. Place   in a large floured loaf pan, or onto a lined baking tray and leave, covered,   to rise until double in size (about 30 minutes).  Preheat oven to 180 C.
  7. Brush   with beaten egg and bake for about 25-30 minutes.  Allow to cool before cutting.
By Thermomix

  1.  Place milk, butter, yeast and sugar into the   mixing bowl – warm 3 min / 37C / speed 2.
  2. Add   flour & salt, knead 3 min /  /  . Place dough in   a large floured bowl, cover and leave in a warm place to rise until doubled   in size (~ 1 hour).
  3. Turn   dough out onto floured surface again and divide into 3 equal portions.  Roll the portions into 30cm lengths to be   braided.  Leave to rest for 5 minutes,   then join the lengths at one end and braid them together. Join at the other   end.
  4. Place   in a large floured loaf pan, or onto a lined baking tray and leave, covered,   to rise until double in size (about 30 minutes).  Preheat oven to 180 C.
  5. Brush   with beaten egg and bake for about 25-30 minutes.  Allow to cool before cutting.

To add dried fruit to the dough, include about 80 g of chopped dried fruit of your choice (I prefer apricots or dates) when you add the flour and salt.

Recipe from “My Way of Cooking” / Thermomix, 2012, 4th ed.

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About baking bohemian

My name is Jen and I am the baking bohemian. My blog identity comes from the cultural background of my mother’s family, (Bohemian), and my mother’s more left wing lifestyle (bohemian). The big ‘B’ Bohemian refers to the rich cultural heritage of our family that emigrated from Bohemia when it was still its own country (it now comprises two thirds of the Czech Republic). Food featured prominently in the family and broader social life of that part of my family. No social interaction was without sustenance, and any celebration, large or small, was an invitation to cook up a storm. My own family emigrated from the United States to Australia when I was a child. For the most part we lived with our mother, and my dad eventually moved back to the US. The little ‘b’ bohemian relates to the semi-alternative lifestyle we led with our mother. I hesitate to refer to her as a hippy, for that conjures up so many misconceptions, but certainly she was on that side of the fence. She was probably more eccentric than radical at the end of the day, but she could really cook. We always set extra plates at the dinner table because inevitably people would visit at dinner time. I started cooking when I was about eight. Cookies. Obviously I was motivated by desire! I loved cooking, I loved that the kitchen was always, in every way, the heart of the house, so I was always part of anything else that was happening while I was cooking. I loved people loving my food. With all the different things that I have done in my life and am interested in, food has remained my most consistent and enduring passion.

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