Category Archives: Side dishes

Spice Roasted Pumpkin

Standard

Spice Roasted Pumpkin

Pumpkins are great vegetables.  You can use them in soups, salads, sweets and more, and they are nutritious and filling.

This recipe is so simple and easy but creates dish so full of flavour that it will be the star of the meal.

Recipe

  • ½ Kent pumpkin (organic if possible)
  • 4 T toasted pepitas
  • 4 T macadamia or avocado oil
  • 1 t ground cinnamon
  • ¼ t cumin
  • Sea salt
  • 2/3 c Greek yoghurt
  • 2 T fresh lemon juice
  • 2 T finely chopped fresh coriander

Preheat oven to 200C. Brush large oven tray with 2 T of oil.

Deseed pumpkin and cut in 1.5 cm wedges. Place in single layer on tray.

In a mortar and pestle lightly crush the toasted pepitas. Add remaining oil, cinnamon and cumin. Spread spice mixture evenly over the pumpkin pieces.  Sprinkle with sea salt. Bake for around 30 minutes or until soft.

Mix yogurt, lemon and coriander together.  Drizzle over the pumpkin immediately before serving.

For a vegan option you can omit the yoghurt, just sprinkle the coriander and lemon over the pumpkin when you serve.  Still delicious!

This recipe was inspired by one in Better Homes and Gardens, July 2013.

Advertisements

Sesame Green Beans

Standard

Sesame Green Beans

This is a super simple and super yummy way to liven up some green beans.  It’s great as a side dish but I will often make it for myself when I feel like having a green lunch.

Recipe

  • 200 g fresh green beans
  • 1 T soy sauce
  • few drops of sesame oil
  • 1 T toasted sesame seeds

Steam or boil green beans until just beginning to soften. Drain the water from the pan. Add soy sauce and sesame oil and toss well to coat.  Place in serving dish and sprinkle generously with sesame seeds.

Lemon Herbed Potatoes

Standard

I don’t eat a lot of potatoes. I like them, but I am very fussy about the way they are cooked.

One of my favourite ingredients to use with potatoes is lemon (I can hear my dad Prof from here – saying ‘eewwwwww’…).

This recipe is light, tangy, nutritious and full of flavour!

Lemon Herbed Potatoes

Recipe

  • 1 kg baby Cream Delight potatoes
  • 1 T white vinegar
  • 2 T Continental parsely, finely chopped
  • 1 T mint, finely chopped
  • 1 T basil, finely chopped
  • 1 t seeded mustard
  • 4 T lemon juice
  • 2 T olive oil
  • salt and pepper to taste

Using medium saucepan add potatoes, cover with water and add white vinegar. Boil until just soft. Immediately drain in colandar and rinse with cold water. Place potatoes in a bowl and toss with the herbs.  Add remaining ingredients, toss again and serve immediately.

Haloumi Pecan Salad

Standard

One of the best things about having the Christmas holiday season during the summer heat is that after a day or two of serious indulgence you start to yearn for a big cool crunchy salad. I haven’t decided whether this compensates for the lack of snow, but it does make it a bit easier to curb that excess!

Haloumi Pecan Salad

This salad is great as a side dish or a main meal.  I only use bacon in it when it is the main, but it is an optional extra.

Recipe

  • 150g peppery rocket / baby spinach mix
  • 1/2 small red onion very finely sliced
  • 75g pecans, roughly chopped
  • seeds from half a pomegranate
  • 100g haloumi
  • 2 rashers bacon, chopped (optional)

Dressing

  • 2 T olive oil
  • 1 T white balsamic vinegar
  • 1/2 t honey
  • 1 t seeded mustard
  • salt and pepper to taste

Place the greens into a large flat bowl.  Fry bacon until just crisp and spread over the greens with the onion. Cut pomegranate in half.  Pull the outer  skin away and gently tease the seeds away from the inside pith. Layer seeds and pecans over the salad, reserving some for garnish.

Mix dressing ingredients together and set aside until needed.

Once all other ingredients are prepared, it is time to prepare the haloumi.  I have found a new brand of haloumi that I love. This is saltier than other brands that I know but it has a lovely flavour and texture. As with any haloumi, you need to serve it as soon as it’s cooked or it will toughen (although if you do find it has toughened up before you are ready to serve, you can zap it quickly in the microwave to soften it up again).

Haloumi Alambra

Cut the haloumi into 1/2cm thick slices.  Fry in dry non-stick frypan on medium high heat until beginning to brown. Flip over and cook until the second side begins to brown.  The second side will cook more quickly.  Remove from heat immediately and cut into 1cm wide strips. Add to salad.

Give the salad a quick toss with just enough dressing to moisten, garnish with pecans and pomegranate, and serve immediately. For a main meal I serve with lebanese bread that has been lightly oiled, sprinkled with herbs and crisped in the oven. Delish!

Haloumi Pecan Salad2

Roast Pumpkin and Rocket Salad

Standard

Rocket is my favourite salad green.  So many things taste good with rocket.  I add it to green salads that might otherwise be bland, and it is a great topping for a range of foods from risotto to casseroles to soups. Rocket is also fabulous as the basis for a salad with nuts, seeds, and an assortment of vegetables.

A salad like the one below works as a main meal for lunch, or as an excellent accompaniment for a simple barbecue.

Recipe

  • 200 g peppery rocket
  • 750 g Kent or Butternut pumpkin
  • 1 lg clove garlic, crushed
  • 1/2 red onion, sliced finely
  • 100 g pecans, cut in half
  • 100 g reduced fat crumbly feta
  • 2 T good quality balsamic vinegar
  • 4 T macadamia oil
  • salt, pepper to taste

Cut pumpkin into 1.5 cm squares. Place on oven tray with garlic and 2 T macadamia oil.  Roast until soft. Set aside to cool.

Wash and drain rocket and place in a shallow salad bowl.  Add pecans and onion to salad bowl. Crumble feta into salad. Add pumpkin and mix salad carefully.

Drizzle with vinegar and remaining oil, and season.

Optional extras

  • 2 rashers bacon rinely chopped and cooked until crispy
  • 3 T toasted pine nuts and/or pumpkin seeds and/or sunflower seeds

Roasted Tomato and Capsicum Salsa

Standard

Salsa is one of my favourite dips.  It is a great spring time dip – so fresh and light. It is also fabulously versatile because you can use it as an accompaniment to so many dishes.

Recipe

  • 6 large tomatores
  • 1 red capsicum
  • 3 cloves garlic
  • 1 T finely diced onions
  • 2 stalk celery finely diced
  • 1 t cumin
  • 1/2 c fresh coriander, chopped
  • olive oil

Brush oven tray with oil and preheat oven to 200C. Chop tomatoes and capscums into quarters, and peel and slice the garlic. Cook until vegetables are soft.  Chop tomatoes and capsicum into small chunks.  Finely chop garlic.

Place 0nion and celery in large saucepan and saute in 1 T olive oil until cooked through.  Reduce heat to low, and add cumin and enough water to keep ingredients from sticking to the pan.   Add tomato mix to pan. Add coriander to the pan and cook until heated through.  Remove from heat.

Once cool, serve with plain corn chips or chopped vegetables (cauliflower is especially good).

Brussel Sprouts with Baby Spinach and Ham

Standard

There aren’t many vegetables that I don’t like, but I have never been a fan of brussel sprouts.  They are such odd little vegies, and odd plants – and with such a strong concentrated cabbage taste.  As a kid we had them all too often. Steamed usually.  As boring as possible.

But they are so healthy: full of anti-oxidents, vitamins C and  K, folate, potassium…  There had to be a recipe out there that would make them appealing.  And for me, this is it!

Recipe

  • 500 g brussel sprouts, trimmed and cut in half
  • 1 T olive oil
  • 1 T butter
  • 75 g  ham or panetta, finely chopped
  • 2 garlic cloves, crushed
  • 150 g baby spinach
  • ½ c chicken or vegetable stock

Cook brussel sprouts in large saucepan of boiling water until just tender. Rinse in cold water.

Heat oil and butter in large frying pan over medium heat. Stir in ham and garlic and cook for 2 minutes.  Add brussel sprouts, spinach and stock. Mix to combine. Cook covered until spinach has wilted and brussel sprouts have softened slightly. Season to taste.

Adapted from Australian Good Taste July 2012.